Shakespeare : Sonnets In XML

A long long time ago I found Shakespeare in XML, by Jon Bosak, and I’ve quite literally carried it around with me ever since.  If you’re not a programming geek you may not know the value of XML, so let me try to explain.  XML is like a database inside a file – it is self describing of what’s in it.  So instead of this:

Act 1, Scene 1

SCENE I. Elsinore. A platform before the castle.
    FRANCISCO at his post. Enter to him BERNARDO
BERNARDO
    Who’s there? You get something more like this: <Act> <Title>Act 1</Title> <Scene> <Title>Scene 1</Title> <Stagedir>Elsinore.  A platform before the castle … </Stagedir> <Speech> <Speaker> <Name>Bernardo</Name> </Speaker> <Line>Who’s there?</Line> </Speech> … Get the idea?  So if you’re a code geek you look at that and start seeing the logic you can apply, like “In Act #3 how many lines are there in all of the speeches spoken by Hamlet?” and it’s quite literally one or two lines of code. Anyway, I never found the Sonnets in XML.  There’s one or two out there as examples of how to do XML, but I never found the whole set of 154, and I wanted it. So I made it.  It’s very basic, but it does what I need.  If others find it useful and make enhancements I’d appreciate hearing about it. Enjoy!

4 thoughts on “Shakespeare : Sonnets In XML

  1. Anonymous Contractor says:

    Thanks Duane! Needed this for syntactic analysis.

  2. Many thanks for this.

    Just to be pedantic, I've spotted what seem to be a few minor errors.

    (I'm comparing with the Project text.)

    Sonnet 22
    Presume not on th;heart when mine is slain,
    -> Presume not on thy heart when mine is slain,

    Sonnet 29
    From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate,;
    -> From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

    Sonnet 44
    I must attend, time's leisure with my moan;
    -> I must attend time's leisure with my moan;

    Sonnet 51
    In winged speed no motion shall I know,
    -> In winged speed n:motion shall I know,

    Sonnet 74
    Too base of thee to be remembered,.
    -> Too base of thee to be remembered.

    Sonnet 149
    But, love, hate on, for now I know thy mind,;
    -> But, love, hate on, for now I know thy mind;

    Sonnet 152
    To swear against the truth so foul a lie.!
    -> To swear against the truth so foul a lie!

    Cheers

    Sam

  3. Thanks, Sam — I will update the file with your corrections shortly.

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